Atomic number

 

 

Atomic number The number of elementary positive charges (protons) con­tained within the nucleus of an atom. It is denoted by the letter Z. Correspondingly, it is also the number of planetary electrons in the neutral atom.

The concept of atomic number emerged from the work of G. Moseley, done in 1913-1914. He measured the wavelengths of the most energetic rays (Kand L lines) produced by using the elements calcium to zinc as targets in an x-ray tube. The square root of the frequency, v, of these x-rays increased by a constant amount in passing from one target to the next. These data, when extended, gave a linear plot of atomic number versus v for all elements studied, using 13 as the atomic number for aluminum and 79 for that of gold.

Moseley’s atomic numbers were quickly recognized as providing an accurate sequence of the elements, which the chemical atomic weights had sometimes failed to do. Additionally, the atomic number sequence indicated the positions of elements that had not yet been discovered.

The atomic number not only identifies the chemical properties of an element but facilitates the description of other aspects of atoms and nuclei. Thus, atoms with the same atomic number are isotopes and belong to the same element, while nuclear reactions may alter the atomic number.

When specifically written, the atomic number is placed as a subscript preceding the symbol of the element, while the mass number (A) precedes as a superscript.

 

 

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